Sustainable Play Equipment

No.1 Xialin Bay, Qingtian

Zhejiang, China

+86 176 8231 2146

WhatsApp: 24/7 Customer Support

9:00 - 17:30 GMT

Online store always open

Prioritizing park projects in Pleasanton | News | PleasantonWeekly.com | – Pleasanton Weekly

News
by Shiri Marwaha / Pleasanton Weekly
Uploaded: Wed, Apr 20, 2022, 8:09 am 4
Updated: Thu, Apr 21, 2022, 2:55 pm
Time to read: about 4 minutes
Design concept for proposed all-abilities playground at Ken Mercer Sports Park in Pleasanton. (Image courtesy city of Pleasanton)
The Pleasanton City Council reviewed plans for many public amenity projects at a special meeting last week, discussing budget allocations to advance some designs but hitting the pause button on many due to funding questions.
The evening session on April 12 began a debate on the All-Abilities Playground Master Plan and the proposed project Ken Mercer Sports Park, which was met with mixed reactions by the council members who found the plan well-designed to fulfill a community need but acknowledged limitations exacerbated by insufficient funding.
Council members unanimously decided to freeze the plan for now, to be revisited again in the future with an amended plan that offered more options for the council to choose from in addition to funding prospects.
“I would definitely support opening up discussions with Three Valleys (Community Foundation) and other organizations that are willing to collect funds on behalf of a project such as this,” Mayor Karla Brown said. “But give us some options so that when we come back, we can say OK.”
Funding availability was a theme throughout the special meeting on how to prioritize parks and other public projects — so much so that Vice Mayor Valerie Arkin floated the notion of the city putting a bond measure to voters to fund park projects, though her idea didn’t elicit much conversation among the council.
Help sustain the local news you depend on.
Your contribution matters. Become a member today.
Next on the list was the conceptual design for renovations of Lions Wayside and Delucchi parks in downtown that was passed unanimously after some discussions and public concerns about retaining aspects like the boulders.
The plan originally drafted in 2014 has made progressive changes to meet the requirements of the new plan. A noticeable modification is retaining the creek as a feature to the plan instead of undergrounding it.
Many regulatory agencies like the Regional Water Quality Control Board asked for the creek to be daylighted, restored and treated as a creek. The water body would provide habitat, improve water quality and restore a natural area as a feature to the park, according to the design team.
The creek will be relocated to the southern side of the park which will help optimize the audience area for the bandstand among other features.
Furthermore, the layout of the new plan gives a better orientation to the bandstand, making it an affable attraction with adequate space for viewing and socializing, according to city staff.
Stay informed
Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox in our Express newsletter.
Stay informed
Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox in our Express newsletter.
“I do think that the idea of keeping the noise pointed away from the neighborhoods is a good one and also not having to look into the sun during the concert to them in the early evening,” Councilmember Kathy Narum said. “I’m also encouraged by the increased space for people to sit and enjoy the concert more than not hanging out or just absolutely cramped.”
The third item up for discussion was removing Muirwood Community Park as a near-term option for a new cricket field and conducting further research for other options such as Bernal Community Park.
The sport of cricket requires open space and council members felt Muirwood Park is unsuitable because the hard cricket ball could cause potential injury to bystanders and park visitors. The council found Ken Mercer Park a better option as a short-term option.
Many residents including students advocated the need for a cricket field at Pleasanton.
Saanvi Immadi, an eighth grader at Harvest Park Middle School, spoke passionately about the need for a cricket field in Pleasanton because players like her are forced to drive to neighboring areas in the Bay Area to play the sport, which is time consuming and not feasible for higher grade students.
Most Viewed Stories
Tri-Valley’s first Five Below store opens in Dublin
Danville Brewing announces expansion into Pleasanton
Pleasanton council gives initial support to ban on gas-powered leaf blowers
Sunol recall group preparing petition to get started on signature gathering
California budget rollercoaster: Analyst predicts $68 billion deficit
Most Viewed Stories
Tri-Valley’s first Five Below store opens in Dublin
Danville Brewing announces expansion into Pleasanton
Other local students talked about how a dedicated cricket pitch is better for their growth in the sport, saying that practicing on other fields with taller grass impedes the process of learning the skills and nuances of the game.
After a detailed deliberation about an ideal location, maintenance and funding, the council decided that as a short-term solution to go with two options at Ken Mercer Park. The final option would be made by the Sports Council, the community and the city’s Parks and Recreation Commission before being brought back to the council for approval.
The motion passed unanimously for the long-term option with Bernal Park.
“It sounds like Bernal really could happen in a reasonable amount of time with a considerably less expense,” Arkin said.
Next on the agenda was a motion to approve the conversion of the two tennis courts into six pickleball courts at Muirwood Park.
“This is where we have the opportunities to look at what facilities we have in our community and where the demographics of the sports being played changes so that we can meet the community’s needs,” Councilmember Jack Balch said.
The final item, the allocation and resourcing of funds for highest priority projects encountered some debate and couldn’t be concluded that night due to time constraints.
Funding is a key challenge, and Brown acknowledged that all the items on the agenda could not be funded 100% and needed to be prioritized.
Budget allocations for a new skate park at Ken Mercer Park took top bill in the discussion, with the council going without any funding allocation.
Council members discussed a scenario proposed by Brown of $500,000 for the cricket field conversion, $4.8 million for roof work and other projects at the Pleasanton Public Library and $2 million for West Las Positas Boulevard rehabilitation, but those figures did not advance and the council ultimately did not take action on those projects that night.
The meeting, which ran for over five hours, wasn’t enough time to make all the remaining decisions and is deferred to a future meeting date yet to be determined.
Editor’s note: Weekly editor Jeremy Walsh contributed to this story.
Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly referenced an action that was not taken. The council finished its conversation on April 12 without making final funding decisions about the cricket field, library improvements and West Las Positas Boulevard roadwork. This updated version also corrects a prior name misspelling. The Weekly regrets the errors.
A front row seat to local high school sports.
Check out our new newsletter, the Playbook.
Follow PleasantonWeekly.com and the Pleasanton Weekly on Twitter @pleasantonnews, Facebook and on Instagram @pleasantonweekly for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

by Shiri Marwaha / Pleasanton Weekly
Uploaded: Wed, Apr 20, 2022, 8:09 am
Updated: Thu, Apr 21, 2022, 2:55 pm

The Pleasanton City Council reviewed plans for many public amenity projects at a special meeting last week, discussing budget allocations to advance some designs but hitting the pause button on many due to funding questions.

The evening session on April 12 began a debate on the All-Abilities Playground Master Plan and the proposed project Ken Mercer Sports Park, which was met with mixed reactions by the council members who found the plan well-designed to fulfill a community need but acknowledged limitations exacerbated by insufficient funding.

Council members unanimously decided to freeze the plan for now, to be revisited again in the future with an amended plan that offered more options for the council to choose from in addition to funding prospects.

“I would definitely support opening up discussions with Three Valleys (Community Foundation) and other organizations that are willing to collect funds on behalf of a project such as this,” Mayor Karla Brown said. “But give us some options so that when we come back, we can say OK.”

Funding availability was a theme throughout the special meeting on how to prioritize parks and other public projects — so much so that Vice Mayor Valerie Arkin floated the notion of the city putting a bond measure to voters to fund park projects, though her idea didn’t elicit much conversation among the council.

Next on the list was the conceptual design for renovations of Lions Wayside and Delucchi parks in downtown that was passed unanimously after some discussions and public concerns about retaining aspects like the boulders.

The plan originally drafted in 2014 has made progressive changes to meet the requirements of the new plan. A noticeable modification is retaining the creek as a feature to the plan instead of undergrounding it.

Many regulatory agencies like the Regional Water Quality Control Board asked for the creek to be daylighted, restored and treated as a creek. The water body would provide habitat, improve water quality and restore a natural area as a feature to the park, according to the design team.

The creek will be relocated to the southern side of the park which will help optimize the audience area for the bandstand among other features.

Furthermore, the layout of the new plan gives a better orientation to the bandstand, making it an affable attraction with adequate space for viewing and socializing, according to city staff.

“I do think that the idea of keeping the noise pointed away from the neighborhoods is a good one and also not having to look into the sun during the concert to them in the early evening,” Councilmember Kathy Narum said. “I’m also encouraged by the increased space for people to sit and enjoy the concert more than not hanging out or just absolutely cramped.”

The third item up for discussion was removing Muirwood Community Park as a near-term option for a new cricket field and conducting further research for other options such as Bernal Community Park.

The sport of cricket requires open space and council members felt Muirwood Park is unsuitable because the hard cricket ball could cause potential injury to bystanders and park visitors. The council found Ken Mercer Park a better option as a short-term option.

Many residents including students advocated the need for a cricket field at Pleasanton.

Saanvi Immadi, an eighth grader at Harvest Park Middle School, spoke passionately about the need for a cricket field in Pleasanton because players like her are forced to drive to neighboring areas in the Bay Area to play the sport, which is time consuming and not feasible for higher grade students.

Other local students talked about how a dedicated cricket pitch is better for their growth in the sport, saying that practicing on other fields with taller grass impedes the process of learning the skills and nuances of the game.

After a detailed deliberation about an ideal location, maintenance and funding, the council decided that as a short-term solution to go with two options at Ken Mercer Park. The final option would be made by the Sports Council, the community and the city’s Parks and Recreation Commission before being brought back to the council for approval.

The motion passed unanimously for the long-term option with Bernal Park.

“It sounds like Bernal really could happen in a reasonable amount of time with a considerably less expense,” Arkin said.

Next on the agenda was a motion to approve the conversion of the two tennis courts into six pickleball courts at Muirwood Park.

“This is where we have the opportunities to look at what facilities we have in our community and where the demographics of the sports being played changes so that we can meet the community’s needs,” Councilmember Jack Balch said.

The final item, the allocation and resourcing of funds for highest priority projects encountered some debate and couldn’t be concluded that night due to time constraints.

Funding is a key challenge, and Brown acknowledged that all the items on the agenda could not be funded 100% and needed to be prioritized.

Budget allocations for a new skate park at Ken Mercer Park took top bill in the discussion, with the council going without any funding allocation.

Council members discussed a scenario proposed by Brown of $500,000 for the cricket field conversion, $4.8 million for roof work and other projects at the Pleasanton Public Library and $2 million for West Las Positas Boulevard rehabilitation, but those figures did not advance and the council ultimately did not take action on those projects that night.

The meeting, which ran for over five hours, wasn’t enough time to make all the remaining decisions and is deferred to a future meeting date yet to be determined.

Editor’s note: Weekly editor Jeremy Walsh contributed to this story.

Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly referenced an action that was not taken. The council finished its conversation on April 12 without making final funding decisions about the cricket field, library improvements and West Las Positas Boulevard roadwork. This updated version also corrects a prior name misspelling. The Weekly regrets the errors.

The Pleasanton City Council reviewed plans for many public amenity projects at a special meeting last week, discussing budget allocations to advance some designs but hitting the pause button on many due to funding questions.
The evening session on April 12 began a debate on the All-Abilities Playground Master Plan and the proposed project Ken Mercer Sports Park, which was met with mixed reactions by the council members who found the plan well-designed to fulfill a community need but acknowledged limitations exacerbated by insufficient funding.
Council members unanimously decided to freeze the plan for now, to be revisited again in the future with an amended plan that offered more options for the council to choose from in addition to funding prospects.
“I would definitely support opening up discussions with Three Valleys (Community Foundation) and other organizations that are willing to collect funds on behalf of a project such as this,” Mayor Karla Brown said. “But give us some options so that when we come back, we can say OK.”
Funding availability was a theme throughout the special meeting on how to prioritize parks and other public projects — so much so that Vice Mayor Valerie Arkin floated the notion of the city putting a bond measure to voters to fund park projects, though her idea didn’t elicit much conversation among the council.
Next on the list was the conceptual design for renovations of Lions Wayside and Delucchi parks in downtown that was passed unanimously after some discussions and public concerns about retaining aspects like the boulders.
The plan originally drafted in 2014 has made progressive changes to meet the requirements of the new plan. A noticeable modification is retaining the creek as a feature to the plan instead of undergrounding it.
Many regulatory agencies like the Regional Water Quality Control Board asked for the creek to be daylighted, restored and treated as a creek. The water body would provide habitat, improve water quality and restore a natural area as a feature to the park, according to the design team.
The creek will be relocated to the southern side of the park which will help optimize the audience area for the bandstand among other features.
Furthermore, the layout of the new plan gives a better orientation to the bandstand, making it an affable attraction with adequate space for viewing and socializing, according to city staff.
“I do think that the idea of keeping the noise pointed away from the neighborhoods is a good one and also not having to look into the sun during the concert to them in the early evening,” Councilmember Kathy Narum said. “I’m also encouraged by the increased space for people to sit and enjoy the concert more than not hanging out or just absolutely cramped.”
The third item up for discussion was removing Muirwood Community Park as a near-term option for a new cricket field and conducting further research for other options such as Bernal Community Park.
The sport of cricket requires open space and council members felt Muirwood Park is unsuitable because the hard cricket ball could cause potential injury to bystanders and park visitors. The council found Ken Mercer Park a better option as a short-term option.
Many residents including students advocated the need for a cricket field at Pleasanton.
Saanvi Immadi, an eighth grader at Harvest Park Middle School, spoke passionately about the need for a cricket field in Pleasanton because players like her are forced to drive to neighboring areas in the Bay Area to play the sport, which is time consuming and not feasible for higher grade students.
Other local students talked about how a dedicated cricket pitch is better for their growth in the sport, saying that practicing on other fields with taller grass impedes the process of learning the skills and nuances of the game.
After a detailed deliberation about an ideal location, maintenance and funding, the council decided that as a short-term solution to go with two options at Ken Mercer Park. The final option would be made by the Sports Council, the community and the city’s Parks and Recreation Commission before being brought back to the council for approval.
The motion passed unanimously for the long-term option with Bernal Park.
“It sounds like Bernal really could happen in a reasonable amount of time with a considerably less expense,” Arkin said.
Next on the agenda was a motion to approve the conversion of the two tennis courts into six pickleball courts at Muirwood Park.
“This is where we have the opportunities to look at what facilities we have in our community and where the demographics of the sports being played changes so that we can meet the community’s needs,” Councilmember Jack Balch said.
The final item, the allocation and resourcing of funds for highest priority projects encountered some debate and couldn’t be concluded that night due to time constraints.
Funding is a key challenge, and Brown acknowledged that all the items on the agenda could not be funded 100% and needed to be prioritized.
Budget allocations for a new skate park at Ken Mercer Park took top bill in the discussion, with the council going without any funding allocation.
Council members discussed a scenario proposed by Brown of $500,000 for the cricket field conversion, $4.8 million for roof work and other projects at the Pleasanton Public Library and $2 million for West Las Positas Boulevard rehabilitation, but those figures did not advance and the council ultimately did not take action on those projects that night.
The meeting, which ran for over five hours, wasn’t enough time to make all the remaining decisions and is deferred to a future meeting date yet to be determined.
Editor’s note: Weekly editor Jeremy Walsh contributed to this story.
Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly referenced an action that was not taken. The council finished its conversation on April 12 without making final funding decisions about the cricket field, library improvements and West Las Positas Boulevard roadwork. This updated version also corrects a prior name misspelling. The Weekly regrets the errors.
The story says the Council agreed to fund our of a CIP reserve $500,00 for a cricket field, $4.8 million for the library and $2 million for W Las Positas rebuild. That is inaccrurate. That was a motion which died. No decisions were made. The priority decision was put off to the future due to the late hour.
Thank you for reaching out, Sharon. You are correct and we have updated our story accordingly. We regret the error.
West las positas is a disaster and a major incident waiting to happen . Actually a death already has. Lumping this fix in with park funding cycles is completely asinine
Agreed… LosPo needs to be completely redone from Foothill to Santa Rita.
Thing continues to sink like the tower in the City.
Don’t miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.
Home
News
TownSquare
Blogs
A&E
Community Calendar
Home & Real Estate
Express
Special Pubs
Shop Pleasanton
Obituaries
Send News Tips
Become a Member
Circulation & Delivery
Promotions

Livermore Vine
DanvilleSanRamon.com
About Us
Contact Us
Advertising Info
Place a Legal Notice
Terms of Use
Privacy Policy
© 2023 PleasantonWeekly.com
All rights reserved.
 
Embarcadero Media
 
PR MediaRelease
Spotlight
Mobile site
© 2023 PleasantonWeekly.com. All rights reserved.

source

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top